Tag Archives: affordable housing

What makes housing affordable?

By Lindsey Kreckler, Engagement Strategist

Affordable housing, like so many other things in life, can be very difficult to define, and instead often is determined by normative statements. What constitutes “affordable” housing can vary widely even within a single city, never mind a country or the entire world. Affordable for whom? Affordable where? Many common definitions of affordable housing do not take these differences into account.

The most commonly occurring definition of affordable housing is that used by the United States government, which defines affordable housing as housing and related expenses (mortgages, utility bills, etc.) that do not exceed 30% of a household’s income. If a family’s housing expenses are higher than 30% of their income, they are considered burdened. This standard can generally be applied to households within the United States, and even in comparably developed countries, such as Australia, the United Kingdom, and Canada.

Another recurring definition of affordable housing, one that takes into account the differences between different geographic areas, looks at individual markets. The median multiple system, used in this report from Demographia and recommended by the World Bank and United Nations, determines the price to income ratio of a market by dividing the median house price by median household income. According to this system, a median multiple of 3.0 or less signifies an affordable housing market, while a median multiple of 5.1 or more demonstrates “severely unaffordable” housing. The map here at Numbeo, based on user-reported numbers, shows a similar measure, the Price to Income Ratio, defined as the “ratio of median apartment prices to median familial disposable income, expressed as years of income.” While these data are user-reported and should be taken with a grain of salt, the map provides an interesting visual of how the United States and other developed economies compare to the Global South and similarly developing economies.

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Secession: the key to more affordable housing in cities?

By Judy Park, Analyst

Panelists at The Atlantic’s CityLab 2014 conference, held this past September, proposed the idea of home rule – or even more radically, city secession – as a potential solution for increasing affordable housing in cities.

aff housing solution home ruleClick ­­­­­­­­­here for the full article.

During the event, Vishaan Chakrabarti of SHoP Architects and Ben Hecht of Living Cities argued that state and national governance often restricts the ability of cities to produce more affordable housing. The solution, they claim, is to emancipate these cities and allow them to subsidize as they please:

“Subsidize the supply, subsidize the demand: We know how to do all of those. We just don’t have the will to do those things,” said Living Cities CEO Ben Hecht. “Singapore and Hong Kong are willing to do those things.”

The thought that cities would be more effective if left to their own devices is not new. In a time where urbanization is widening the physical and sociopolitical discrepancy between the city and its surroundings, and where cities are increasingly outpacing the GDP of entire countries, it makes some sense.

But good governance is tricky and inevitably context-specific. Home rule could be exactly what that blue bastion in a sea of red needs to build more affordable housing. Unconstrained by state and national regulations, a city could more easily raise and borrow money from their tax base and capital markets. It could vote to direct more money to affordable housing needs.

In other instances, however, the state’s ability to override local priorities and decisions is important and beneficial for affordable housing, as in the case of Massachusetts’ Chapter 40B, a statute that allows an affordable housing developer to obtain state zoning overrides for building in municipalities that fail to meet their 10% affordable housing requirement.

Further, in choosing Singapore and Hong Kong as their poster-children, the panelists seem to imply that the production of mass public housing indicates success: in Singapore, 82% of citizens live in flats built by the government (via the Housing Development Board, or HDB), and in Hong Kong, this figure is slightly less than half.

But all is not well, especially in Hong Kong, which still suffers from a high shortage of public housing and recently won its fourth successive crown for having the most unaffordable housing in the world. Supply may be high, but demand is even higher. Those who are able to qualify for a government flat typically wait three years or more. In the meantime, many residents have no choice but to live in grossly overcrowded units, which have been referred to as cages, that average around 40 square feet. Such housing may technically qualify as “affordable,” but it is certainly not suitable.

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Soaring, high-density public housing in Hong Kong.

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Society for Community Organization, a local advocacy group, documents the conditions in the cage homes of Hong Kong. Photo by Benny Lam, for the Society for Community Organization.

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Indonesia photo-share: self-help housing in Depok

By: Duong Huynh, Project Manager

As part of the housing sector mission to Indonesia, I joined another colleague Matt Nohn, whose work focuses on incremental housing, and a team of staff from Indonesian Ministry of Housing to visit Depok. After a 1+ hour drive through some peaceful Indonesian peri-urban farm land, we landed in Depok to begin our tour of a few of the city’s self-help housing project.

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Self-help housing belonging to a family of one working mom and three daughters.

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